Posted in

Research

Dr. Jay Clugston Published in the Journal of Neurosurgery

Congratulations to Jay Clugston, MD, MS, CAQSM for his continued efforts in concussion research. Dr. Clugston, who is a Florida Gator’s Team Physician, recently co-authored new guidelines that were published in the journal of Neurosurgery. The guidelines recommend assessing concussions as early as three days of injury for five…

Poster at EPI Research Day Feb 18

Our department also participated in the UF Emerging Pathogens Research Day on February 18, 2016.  Lively and interesting event, great keynote speakers.  I was coauthor on the following poster: Identifying Malaria Risk Factors in a Hyper-Endemic Setting Using Baynesian Model Selection. Justin Millar, Paul Psychas, Denis Valle. I am happy to share the abstract…

CHFM Well-Represented at UF College of Medicine, Celebration of Research

Our department was well-represented at the UF College of Medicine 2016 Celebration of Research held February 22, 2016, with the posters and investigators noted below. I very much appreciate the presenters time and effort to conduct the studies and present (and represent the department in…

2016 AMSSM Foundation Research Grant Recipients Announced

Congratulations to former fellows and current UF faculty; Dr. Edenfield and Dr. Herman, for your 2016 AMSSM Foundation Research Grants!!!!!!!!  That is 2 of the 3 total awards! -Jay James R. “Jay” Clugston, MD, CAQSM Associate Professor Student Health Care Center Congratulations to the recipients of the 2016 AMSSM…

Research Coordinator Program for Excellence in Human Subject Research

UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute Call for Applications – CTSI Academy of Research Excellence Research Coordinator Program Research Coordinator Program for Excellence in Human Subject Research The CTSI Academy of Research Excellence is now accepting applications for its Fall 2014 research coordinator program. This is an advanced, practically-oriented…

Vision Test Improves Concussion Detection

In a new study conducted on male and female athletes at the University of Florida College of Medicine, most subjects who took the King-Devick test soon after suffering a concussion showed reductions in speed and accuracy that were marked enough to reveal mild traumatic brain injury. Find this article on…